What will the results tell me about my child?


By comparing your child’s test scores to scores of children of similar ages, the neuropsychologist can create a profile of your child’s strengths and weaknesses.

The results help those involved in your child’s care in a number of ways:

A) Testing can explain why your child is having school challenges. For example, a child may have difficulty reading because of an attention problem, a language disorder, an auditory processing problem, or a learning disability.

B ) Testing also guides the pediatric neuropsychologist’s design of interventions to draw upon your child’s strengths. The results identify what skills to work on, as well as which strategies to use to help your child.

C) Testing can help detect the effects of developmental, neurological, and medical problems, such as epilepsy, autism, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), dyslexia, or a genetic disorder.

D) Testing may be done to obtain a baseline against which to measure the outcome of treatment or the child’s development over time.

E) Different childhood disorders result in specific patterns of strengths and weaknesses. These profiles of abilities can help identify a child’s disorder and the brain areas that are involved.

For example, testing can help differentiate between an attention deficit and depression or determine whether a language delay is due to a problem in producing speech, understanding or expressing language, social shyness, autism, or cognitive delay.

Your neuropsychologist may work with your physician to combine results from medical tests, such as brain imaging or blood tests, to diagnose your child’s problem.

Most importantly, testing provides a better understanding of the child’s behavior and learning in school, at home, and in the community.

The evaluation can guide teachers, therapists, and your families to better help your child achieve his or her potential.